Connecting dots of digital learning

8 More Game Portals to Find The Right Games for Your Lessons

We’ve put together “6 Sites to Find The Right Games for Your Lessons“, now here are 8 more sites to find the right games. It’s exciting to see more efforts to help teachers integrating games into learning.

Survey of Electronic Games that Teach

Check out www.wingz2fly.com and select “Search” on the right. You can see information about 1500+ educational computer games.  (It will soon be moved to www.i-elearn.org.)

In this project, we have searched for effectiveness studies that have been conducted on educational games that teach and we have searched for any findings those studies may have come to. Dr. Carol L. Redfield, professor of Computer Science at St. Mary’s University in San Antonio, Texas, has done similar research on games that were available to teach or practice concepts in K-12 curriculum in the 1990s. She found then that there was only one software tool that had any effectiveness study conducted with it. One the goals for this project was be to find out if any other effectiveness studies have been performed and determine what else can be done to enhance learning through the use of computer games.

In June 2005 Diane Gaither and Dr. Carol L. Redfield surveyed the existing educational games, reviewed educational gaming literature, and developed a database of educational games and what they are expected to teach. This website makes our findings available to you! As of May 2011, we have 1513 games in our database. Our database keeps growing as we continually add games that have teaching elements in them.

PLAYFORCE

game-based learning

A community built for and by players, parents, and educators to discover and share learning experiences in games. You can search games recommended and commented by other members. Participating in the community is like playing a game. Join the “game” and get some training. May the force be with you!

Playforce is built allowing users to write and share perspectives about their own experiences. A perspective is a special kind of post pertaining to a game of the submitter’s choice.

Each perspective contains serveral things. Firstly, it attaches one or more learning topics to the game in question. It also contains a title and body of text with more detail about the user’s experiences and why those topics were chosen. Let’s take a closer look at perspectives and how they’re written….

ENGAGE Learning

ENGAGE stands for European Network for Growing Activity in Game-based learning in Education.

game-based learning

The ENGAGE activities are to prove that GBL is a method applicable for all five sectors of education, the ENGAGE tools will support adaptation of GBL regarding local and cultural issues. The on-line catalogue of game reviews for learning includes localization and cultural issues as well as information about quality and rating. The reviews contain case studies of how these games may be used in a classroom environment and suggested implementation of the game. The experience of the reviewer is tabled and a walkthrough to reduce the learning curve is detailed. This is available online and accessible using the search tool.

Learning with Games, a teachers guide.

Professor Dr’s Maja and Paul Pivec have completed a teachers guide for learning with Digital Games for the Austrian Federal Ministry of Economy, Family and Youth. Currently in published in German, the PDF can be freely downloaded from their web site – Lernen mit Computerspielen (Online-Version) (PDF, 5531 KB).

All of the digital games reviewed in this book are to supplement learning and not to replace the teacher or the classroom environment. None of the games included in the book are difficult to learn and the learning curve is small. Additional teacher resources are available from the product and community web sites, and selected internet sites are listed with each game description. All of these games are supported on both the PC and Mac platforms and are suitable for classroom technology running on lightly configured machines. Several games are also available as free iPhone apps.

kyle mawer

In this wiki, Kyle Mawer built the catelogue with comprehensive list of games in different genres : arcades, puzzles, escaping the rooms, MMORPGs, virtual worlds and vocabulary games. He is an English Language Teacher at British Council, Barcelona, Spain, specialized in using games in language learning.

This site contains games with walkthroughs (written text or video). Gamers, learners or teachers are welcome. It is dedicated to adapting online (free to play) computer games for use in the English language learning classroom. As well as covering grammar and vocabulary areas the main aim is to cover skills work (reading, writing, listening and speaking).

In his book Digital Play there are three distinctive parts which focus in turn on theory, practice and development of game-based learning in English language learning.

Common Sense Media Learning Ratings

For nearly a decade, Common Sense Media has been providing parents and educators with the information they need to choose high-quality media for their kids. As the digital world explodes, parents need help sorting the truly educational content from the content that’s slapped with an ‘educational’ label by marketers. Check out the offering “Learning Rating” initiative:

Looking for fun games that require critical thinking skills? Cool apps that exercise creative muscles? Engaging websites that encourage vocabulary building through collaboration? We’ve sifted through the vast sea of products out there and rated and reviewed each one based on its learning potential so you can find engaging and fun apps, games, and websites that help equip kids and teens with the skills they need to thrive in tomorrow’s world.

The ratings and reviews provide parents, teachers, teens, and kids with a guide to find the games, sites, and apps that can extend learning time, make learning fun, and build skills that the next generation will need to be successful in the 21st century.

Children’s Technology Review

game-based learningChildren’s Technology Review is a longitudinal study of children’s interactive media products that started in 1985. The reviews and ratings are housed in an internal database with 12,522 commercial products (as of May 2011) for approximately 18 platforms. Subscribers have online access to select fields from this database.

To better understand our rating process, we recommend that you watch this video.

The six categories in the instrument can help you better understand factors that may be related to “quality” in a children’s interactive media product. In brief, the instrument favors software that is easy to use, child controlled, has solid educational content, is engaging and fun and is designed with features that you’d expect to see, and is worth the money given the current state of children’s interactive media publishing.

TES iBoard

Here you can discover hundreds of free interactive games and lesson plans all aligned to Common Core & state standards. From kindergarten to grade 5th, all major subjects Math, Language Arts, Science and Social Studies are covered.

BarinPop

GameUp offers a free collection of top-quality online games that tie right into curriculum and align to Common Core & state standards. Lesson plans , tips, student-made games and more game-based learning resources are available for busy teachers.

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3 Responses »

  1. Reblogged this on Gaming and Education and commented:
    It is always helpful to find the right games for lessons! Thanks for the post.

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